METHYLTESTOSTERONE

- Everything we could find out about it

Home ] [ Controlled Substances ] [ Steroids ]

Created Jul 2020 | Updated Oct 2020

METHYLTESTOSTERONE

  • [ANDROID]
  • [ORETON]
  • [TESTRED]
  • [VIRILON]
  • [METANDREN]

(17ALPHA-METHYL-17BETA-HYDROXYANDROST-4-EN-3-ONE)

DEA CODE 4000: Schedule 3

Methyltestosterone is an anabolic steroid hormone used to treat men with a testosterone deficiency. It is also used in women to treat breast cancer, breast pain, swelling due to pregnancy, and with the addition of estrogen it can treat symptoms of menopause. The effects of testosterone in humans and other vertebrates occur by way of two main mechanisms: by activation of the androgen receptor (directly or as DHT), and by conversion to estradiol and activation of certain estrogen receptors. Free testosterone (T) is transported into the cytoplasm of target tissue cells, where it can bind to the androgen receptor, or can be reduced to -dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by the cytoplasmic enzyme 5α-reductase. DHT binds to the same androgen receptor even more strongly than T, so that its androgenic potency is about 2.5 times that of T. The T-receptor or DHT-receptor complex undergoes a structural change that allows it to move into the cell nucleus and bind directly to specific nucleotide sequences of the chromosomal DNA. The areas of binding are called hormone response elements (HREs), and influence transcriptional activity of certain genes, producing the androgen effects. Methyltestosterone is marketed under the brand names Android, Androral, Metandren, Oraviron, Testred, Virilon.

Prescribed for:
    What Conditions does it Treat?
  • Low Testosterone

Uses:
This medication is used in men who do not make enough of a natural substance called testosterone.

In males, testosterone is responsible for many normal functions, including growth and development of the genitals, muscles, and bones.

It also helps cause normal sexual development (puberty) in boys. Methyltestosterone is similar to the natural testosterone produced by your body. It belongs to a class of drugs known as androgens. It works by affecting many body systems so that the body can develop and function normally. Methyltestosterone may also be used in certain adolescent boys to cause puberty in those with delayed puberty. It may also be used to treat certain types of breast cancer in women.

Before using:
Tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of:

  • Cancer (such as breast cancer in men, prostate cancer)
  • Blood clots (such as in the leg, lungs)
  • Heart disease (such as heart failure, chest pain, heart attack)
  • Stroke
  • Liver problems
  • Kidney problems
  • Certain mineral imbalance (high calcium blood level)
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Enlarged prostate
  • Breathing problems (such as sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-COPD)
  • Diabetes

Precautions:

If you have diabetes: this product may lower your blood sugar. Check your blood sugar regularly as directed and share the results with your doctor. Tell your doctor right away if you have symptoms of low blood sugar, such as sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Your doctor may need to adjust your diabetes medication, exercise program, or diet.

This drug may affect your cholesterol and may increase your risk of heart or blood vessel problems (coronary artery disease). Your doctor will monitor your cholesterol level closely.

Tell your doctor if you become bed-ridden (unable to walk) for a prolonged time while using this medication. Your doctor may monitor your blood calcium level to prevent problems.

What is methyltestosterone?
Methyltestosterone is a man-made form of testosterone, a naturally occurring sex hormone that is produced in a man's testicles. Small amounts of testosterone are also produced in a woman's ovaries and adrenal system. Methyltestosterone is used in men and boys to treat conditions caused by a lack of this hormone, such as delayed puberty or other hormonal imbalances. Methyltestosterone is also used in women to treat breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.

Important Information:
Do not use methyltestosterone if you are pregnant. You should not use methyltestosterone if you have prostate cancer or male breast cancer.

Interactions:

Drug Interactions (77) Alcohol/Food Interactions (1) Disease Interactions (10)


What other drugs will affect Methyltestosterone?
Other drugs may interact with methyltestosterone, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

A total of 77 drugs are known to interact with Methyltestosterone.

  • 9 major drug interactions
    • anisindione
    • carfilzomib
    • dicumarol
    • leflunomide
    • lomitapide
    • mipomersen
    • pexidartinib
    • teriflunomide
    • warfarin
  • 68 moderate drug interactions

Warnings:
Caution should be exercised in patients with history of heart disease, liver or kidney impairment, cancer, mineral imbalance, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, enlarged prostate, breathing problems, sugar, any allergy, who are taking other medications, during pregnancy and breastfeeding. It may cause dizziness, do not drive a car or operate machinery while taking this medication.

History:
Methyltestosterone was first described in 1935 and was one of the first oral androgens to be used in clinical medicine (it follows Proviron, the first oral androgen, by one year). Its main clinical use at the time of development was as an oral medication to replace testosterone (and its anabolic and/or androgenic activity) in males when endogenous levels were insufficient (Andropause), although the drug was adopted for a number of other uses over the years as well. These include the treatment of cryptorchidism (undescended testicles), breast cancer in postmenopausal women, excessive lactation and breast pain after pregnancy in mothers not nursing, osteoporosis, and, more recently, female menopause (supporting the overall energy and sexual interest of the patient). In addition to standard tablets and capsules, methyltestosterone has also been commercially prepared in sublingual or buccal tablets.

BODYBUILDING QUESTION:
I've picked up a box of methyltestosterone from Aburaihan. Everyone says it's a terrible steroid to take and its only good for aggression. Can I make any gains on it?

ANSWER:
Methyltestosterone was the "original" oral steroid. Going back several decades, it was the first anabolic steroid that seemed to hold significant efficacy when taken orally. For chemistry geeks, methyltestosterone is simply testosterone with an added methyl group at c-17, which slows its liver breakdown. This testosterone variant did seem to work as an oral androgen supplement during the early years of medical use. But it was also fairly problematic, especially by today's standards. One of the main issues is that it tends to be highly estrogenic. It turns out this is because methyltestosterone readily converts to a very potent "super estrogen" called methylestradiol, which is several times more active than normal estrogen (estradiol). For a bodybuilder looking to harness the muscle-building potential of methyltestosterone, the dose used is going to be pretty substantial (probably 25-40 mg per day). At this level, you're going to notice significant estrogen conversion, and thus will have to endure or fight off side effects like water bloat and gynecomastia. The thing is, by the time athletes caught on to steroids during the 1960s and '70s, less estrogenic alternatives like methandrostenolone (Dianabol) and stanozolol (Winstrol) were already on the market. These are the drugs that became very popular. Methyltestosterone always languished as an unpopular and rarely used "problematic" steroid. You'd rarely even find dealers carrying it.

Harmful to the liver:
Methyltestosterone is one of the oldest oral steroids. Since it is 17-alpha alkaline, it is very harmful to the liver, like all other oral steroids. It has a relatively good androgenic effect in combination with a weak anabolic effect. Methyltestosterone is usually used in the bodybuilding / sport for the short term increase of the force and aggressiveness. The highest efficiency is achieved after approx. 2 hours. It is not very good for muscle mass build-up because the side effects are too high in relation to the desired effects. There are many less harmful alternatives here. There are now many sublingual tablets of methyltestosterone which are kept under the tongue in the mouth and are absorbed primarily by the oral mucosa.

Side effects:
Hypertonia, acne vulgaris, gynecomastia, increased water retention, edema, testicular atrophy, decreased spermatogenesis, increased aggressiveness, voice deepening, accelerated hair loss, increased body hair, oily skin, prostate enlargement

Doping information:
Methyltestosterone can be detected up to 6 weeks after the last dose.

Application / Dosage:
Methyltestosterone is mainly used for short-term increases in aggression and strength. This is usually taken between 25 - 50 mg, 1 hour before the workout.

Methyltestosterone is nowhere near as popular as it once was, but in some parts of the planet, it is still a viable steroid. Paradoxically so, in the United States, methyl test is not commonly available for prescription. However, at the same time, there is a ton of it sitting around in supply. It is often used to treat low test in men, and it is also used to deal with a similarly rare condition called andropause, where the body stops producing natural testosterone in men. It also is used to treat cryptorchidism, and it has been used to treat breast cancer, excessive rates of lactation after pregnancy, and even osteoporosis. Methyltestosterone has even been used to deal with women suffering from menopause by enhancing a weakened libido, and in the modern era, it remains a great treatment for those suffering from the effects of menopause. Most women at that point will find themselves being prescribed alternative formulations of testosterone, but remember, Methyltestosterone is still an option. Aside from the oral formulation, there have been popular mixes of test and progesterone creams or transdermal gels that transfer the hormone that way. Aside from that, but subcutaneous tablets like that of Testopel and competitors are also popular ways to take in the hormone.

Testred (methyltestosterone)
Side Effects:
Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.
RxList
Call your doctor at once if you have:
  • changes in skin color
  • increased or ongoing erection of the penis
  • shortness of breath (even with mild exertion)
  • swelling, rapid weight gain
  • liver problems - nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, tired feeling, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)
Women using methyltestosterone may develop male characteristics, which could be irreversible if treatment is continued. Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you notice any of these signs of excess testosterone:
  • acne
  • changes in menstrual periods
  • male-pattern hair growth (such as on the chin or chest)
  • hoarse or deepened voice
  • enlarged clitoris
Common side effects (in men or women) may include:
  • breast swelling
  • headache, anxiety, depressed mood
  • numbness or tingly feeling
  • increased or decreased interest in sex
This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Testred (Methyltestosterone)
Maximum Dosage:
Prescribers Digital Reference
Adults: The maximum dosage is dependent on indication for therapy.
Elderly: The maximum dosage is dependent on indication for therapy.
Adolescents: The maximum dosage is dependent on indication for therapy.
Children: The maximum dosage is dependent on indication for therapy.

Also known as android or testred

  • Methyltestosterone is a potentially toxic compound.
  • Considered to be a steroid lipid molecule.
  • A very hydrophobic molecule, practically insoluble (in water), and relatively neutral.
  • Belongs to the class of organic compounds known as androgens and derivatives.
    • They are known to favor the development of masculine characteristics.
    • They also show profound effects on scalp and body hair in humans.

fda PDF Android

WHO PDF Methyltestosterone

Caymanchem PDF Methyltestosterone

Brand Names:
Afro, Agovirin, Android, Androral, Mesteron, Metandren, Methitest, Methyltestosterone, Methyl Testosterone, Oraviron, Oreton, Oreton Methyl, Testormon, Testovis, Testred, and Virilon, among others.

Methyltestosterone is available at a low-dose in combination with esterified estrogens for the treatment of menopausal symptoms like hot flashes in women under the brand names Covaryx, Essian, Estratest, Menogen, and Syntest.

  
How to Take Methyltestosterone and Dose of Methyltestosterone - Find out how to take Methyltestosterone (drug) and its dose. Describes the best time to take the drug and precautions if any that should be followed. Caution should be exercised in patients with ...
Monday December 15, 2014 - medindia.net

What should I Know Regarding Pregnancy, Nursing and Administering Methyltestosterone to Children or the Elderly? - management or monitoring precaution: General-Avoid use in the elderly unless indicated for moderate to severe hypogonadism. Safer alternatives available. Urogenital-Risks for prostatic hypertrophy ...
Saturday May 27, 2017 - webmd.com

Statin Drugs to Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Mortality - This may result from the evolution of tumor cells between the primary and metastatic tumor or be related to primary tumor drug penetrance. In order to better investigate the differential potency ...
Wednesday January 18, 2023 - medscape.com

What should I Know Regarding Pregnancy, Nursing and Administering ESTROGEN-METHYLTESTOSTERONE to Children or the Elderly? - management or monitoring precaution: General-Avoid use in the elderly unless indicated for moderate to severe hypogonadism. Safer alternatives available. Urogenital-Risks for prostatic hypertrophy ...
Wednesday November 06, 2013 - webmd.com

Statin Drugs to Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Mortality - Epidemiologic studies have, variably, shown the concomitant use of statin drugs to be beneficial to cancer outcomes. Statin drugs have been FDA approved for three decades for the treatment of high ...
Sunday February 10, 2019 - medscape.com

  
Steroids | Link to this page

Home ] [ Controlled Substances ] [ Sources ]


· Controlled Substances
· Steroids
· Methyltestosterone